They Quit…but Never Leave!

He is the guy that does just enough not to get fired.  Perhaps he used to be motivated, maybe even a top performer at one point in time.  But now he just can’t be bothered.  He rarely has ideas and is usually only passionate about not changing (anything) and making sure he is not inconvenienced with the job.  Mostly, they have quit without leaving the job.  How do managers deal with these people?  What kinds of things can you do to help bring them back?  Or perhaps get them actually to leave?

Engage and inspire them.  A leader needs to understand their people.  What drives them and makes them want to work hard?  It sounds like standard advice, but to be honest, you probably don’t have the capacity to understand and engage all of your people on an individual level enough to engage and inspire them.  What you do have time for is some of them.  The focus should be on your high performers and those you feel you can move into the high performing category.  Those people like the guy described above should not be the main priority.  As the leader/manager, you should be removing obstacles from your team.  It is in this capacity that you will need to deal with the poor performers.

Accountability is key.  Opportunity is also key.  Mostly we describe opportunity as the opportunity for success, but there is an equal chance for failure at every opportunity.  When an employee has quit, we need to engage and see if we can get them back on the team and performing at a high level.  If you can’t, give them opportunities.  Then hold them accountable when they don’t perform to the standard. You have to give them a final chance to show what they can do.  This, of course, assumes that you have effectively communicated to them about their performance and what the standard is.

What if you don’t have the authority to fire?  This certainly complicates things, but only means you now have to convince the person or persons who have firing authority to take action.  This is normally pretty simple.  Document the performance along with any failures to meet standards, and before long the HR department or other supervisors/managers will have to take action.  A big point to include when dealing with this situation is that having employees like this can be detrimental to the culture of the organization, especially if these employees are charismatic and influential.

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Dependent or Empowered Followers

Dependent and empower followers is leadership at two different levels.  The beginning level is where dependent followers thrive.  That first step of leadership is creating followers that are dependent on guidance.  The dependent follower is also at the start of their management and leadership journey.  The first level leader and dependent follower complement each other, they both fulfill the needs of the other.  The first level leader needs people that need them.  They need to experiment together and grow.  Many leaders do not graduate to the next level of leadership.  Some of this is because they’re trying to move to the next level.  They are most likely not even aware they are at the beginning level of leadership and are not deliberately trying to proceed to the higher levels.

The second level of leadership is where the leader begins to realize that dependent followers can be limiting.  This second level of leadership can be evasive as well because a follower that is becoming a leader already will give the leader the illusion that they are in the second level of leadership, but it immediately disappears when this follower moves on to be their own leader.  The second level of leadership is about removing the chains that keep the follower tied to the leader by empowering them.  Cutting the chains and letting them make decisions, run operations, experiment in their own leadership capacity, and learn from mistakes.

What can stop a leader from moving to the second level?  Many things, but mostly ego and pride!  When a leader refuses to let go of power (regardless of the type of power) it traps them in the first level.  The reasons are all the same.  They aren’t ready to lead.  I can’t trust them to do the right thing.  More often than not, the problem is the leader.  They want to feel important, and when you have empowered followers, they need you less and less.  The crazy part is that is a great thing!  Having followers that can perform at a high level because you trained and mentored them should be the goal.  How much more time will you have to grow as a leader and develop better ways to improve your surroundings when you no longer have to always direct your subordinates every move?

My position in the organization is one of constant rotation.  I am constantly faced with new managers and inexperienced managers.  Or managers that have resigned themselves to be micromanagers because they have never known a leader than empowers followers.  Once they trust me and know it isn’t a trick, they flourish like never before.

 

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