Leadership Lessons From The Fireplace

We are all Tools!

When I was a kid growing up in Southern Utah almost everyone I knew had a fireplace or a wood burning stove of some kind. Almost without exception, sitting next to the wonderful heat producing factory was a kit of tools. In this kit contained a mini shovel, broom and what we called a poker! The shovel was used to remove the ashes from the fireplace, the broom for cleaning the around the fireplace after you inevitably spilled ash and charred wood on the floor. My favorite, the poker, was used to stoke the fire, move burning logs around so you could place additional pieces in the fire.

As managers and leaders in organizations, regardless of size, we have to always be mindful that we are leading people who have specific talents, skills, and abilities. Each of your employees is different! They have different drivers, biases, abilities, etc. and leaders need to take the time and get to know their team members. Who are the extroverts, introverts, the career driven, the content, the charismatic and the list goes on.

Talent management is vital to achieving the goals and overall mission of that organization. We are not the same and cannot all achieve the same level of performance at each task as everyone else. For instance, the shy, introverted, data analyst is not the best person to give a facility tour of your new freight distribution center to prospective clients. You have to pick a different tool for that job. If you have an underperforming branch and need a quick turn-around, who do you send? A poker! Not a broom or a shovel, you need someone to move things around, shake things up and stoke the fire. Who is your poker? When your organization suffers from loss, whether a tragic personal loss or your poker pushed the team and they still did not meet the goal, what leader do you send?

Very few companies are operating at this level of leadership and management. It requires deliberate thought and deliberate action to specific situations. We are tools. I am a specific tool for specific jobs. I know my limits and will not let personal pride hinder my team from accomplishing our goals and the overall mission of my organization. I will call in other leaders/tools to deal with specific situations when I am beyond my limits.

Be aware that some of your brooms want to be pokers and vice versa. This is dealt with during feedback and in my experience will cause conflict, which is good. If you go back to your conflict-resolution training, avoidance, in this case, is not an option. A broom can never be a poker!

The next time you see some ashes try to pick them up with the poker! You will see my point…

I’ll leave you with this;

What tools are sitting next to your fireplace?

-Do you need more options?

Are you aware of the tools you have available to deal with all the situations in your company?

Unfortunately, unlike purchasing a Fireplace Took Kit online for about $100, developing your supervisors and managers to look for the right person to attack specific concerns will not be that simple, but well worth your time to invest in.

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6 Steps to Keep Employees

There are many ways to keep employees around.  The key to employee retention is to create an environment that any reasonable employee will enjoy being a part of.  Not every job is glamorous, and many times people do not enjoy what they do.  Creating a happy working environment and having great managers by following the below steps will make things much better!

  1. Track your retention levels

There is no way to effectively manage the retention level in your organization if you do not track it.  The most common goal for employee retention is around 90%, but the reality is every field and organization is different.  The caliber of your staff that are leaving and the critical positions they are vacating might be crippling to your organization even if the number is higher than 90%.  Additionally, a little turnover is a good thing; fresh ideas, fresh perspective, fresh attitude, and the motivation of a new employee can be a great boost to the team!

  1. Culture

Culture is what you make of it.  You can deliberately determine culture, or you can let the culture grow on its own developing into whatever it happens to become.  Most managers do not take an active role in culture, and that is why many organizations have a poor or negative culture.  The first step to changing the culture is to decide what culture you want.  Write it down!  Print it on paper and tape it to your desk or in another area that is visible and read it often.  These parts of the culture you write down will need to guide your decision making.  If you are making policy and decisions, you should ask if your decisions and policies are in line with the culture you are trying to create.  If not, you need to change the decisions or the cultural goals.

  1. Invest in your Employees

Investing in your employees is usually seen as providing them education or training that helps the organization.  And if you can align a person’s wishes or passion and your organization’s goals, then you have the winning formula.  But in many cases, you will have a box packer that wants to be a nurse.  Or a concrete finisher that seeks to be a CPA.  So, in this case giving them training in the field they are currently in, will only get you a marginal improvement.  If you can make it happen, the best thing to do would be to provide aid for your box packer to go to nursing school.  Or give them a week of paid time-off so they can spend some time with a real nurse to see if it is something they want to do.  If you can help your employees realize their dreams, good things will always come back to the organization.  And it is the best thing to do.  Who knows, maybe you can bring him/her back after nursing school to create an on-site nurse position/department.

  1. Recognition

Recognition is one of the easiest things to do, but one of the most neglected.  A formal recognition program is mandatory.  If your company does not have one, then create one.  But outside of the formal program, you need to pay attention to the opportunities presented to recognize high-quality performers.  Add a reminder to your phone on a weekly basis to get out from behind your computer or whatever you are doing and find people doing good things.  Leaders seek out opportunities to thank their people and encourage positive behavior.

  1. Feedback

This is another thing that is easy but often neglected.  Informal feedback is super easy and very powerful.  Formal feedback can be detached and robotic if not done properly.  The key is to have clear examples of the behavior the person displays and use these models to eliminate negative behaviors and reinforce positive behaviors.

  1. Quality evaluations that strengthen the all of the above initiatives

Lastly, build or rework the evaluation system of your organization.  Take the time to review what your evaluations value.  What message do they send? They need to incorporate the new culture, initiatives and measure the performance of your people against the critical standards.

 

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